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CQC adopts 9% increase in registration fees

Posted on March 24th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off

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Following a 9% increase for 2015/16, care homes will have to pay considerably more in registration fees from April.

The Care Quality Commission announced the increase in late March, following a public consultation last year and approval from the Secretary of State for Health. In the announcement, CQC gave the example a care home with 21 to 25 beds, which would have to pay an increase of £238.

The regulator said it would publish a calculator on its website in April to help providers work out their exact fees for 2015/16, alongside detailed fees guidance.

In the summer, CQC will introduce the option for providers to pay by instalments and by direct debit, to help them manage their cash flows.


GMB joins corporates in warning of care homes crisis

Posted on March 23rd, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off

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Four Seasons Health Care, Bupa and HC-One, the three biggest operators in the UK’s £24bn care home market, have been joined by the GMB union in warning that the system is in crisis.

GMB, which includes care home staff in its membership, have publicly support the warning from Britain’s biggest providers of care homes for elderly people that cuts to public funding for residents are ‘unsustainable’ and that more homes will close unless the situation improves. GMB national officer for social care Justin Bowden said repeated warnings from GMB that Southern Cross would collapse had been repeatedly ignored by government.

“Warnings that the entire care sector is in a slow motion collapse, albeit for different reasons to Southern Cross, are falling on the same deaf ears,” said Mr Bowden.

“If we are not prepared to learn the lessons of history, we … Read More »


Report recommends free social care for terminally-ill people

Posted on March 16th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off

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A report published by the Health Select Committee published in mid-March has reviewed the state of end of life care, making a number of recommendations for improvement, including that social care should be free at the end of life.

Based on evidence from clinicians, charities and palliative care experts, the report found ‘great variation in quality and practice across both acute and community settings’ in England.

End-of-life care is defined as people expected to die within 12 months, most of whom will have incurable or progressive illnesses like dementia. Care minister Norman Lamb has said that the Government is looking carefully at a policy of free end-of-life care.

George McNamara, head of policy and public affairs at the Alzheimer’s Society, said people with dementia were currently obliged to pay a “dementia tax” of thousands of pounds for essential care, especially towards … Read More »





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