Caring Times News


Bedrails – a risk-laden remedy

Posted on September 13th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Bedrails – a risk-laden remedy

DAVID EDWARDS,associate solicitor and head of the healthcare and regulatory teams at Harrison Drury Solicitors looks at a recent case involving BUPA Care Homes.

01772 258321 david.edwards@harrison-drury.com

In May this, Bupa Care Homes (CFC Homes) Ltd were brought before Carlisle Magistrates Court by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) in consequence of an incident involving bedrails in which a resident died at one the company’s care homes. Bupa was fined £400,000 with costs of £15,206.

The Court found that the company had failed to ensure that the resident’s bedrail assessment was suitable and sufficient, or that staff were adequately trained in bedrail risk assessments. They Court said reviews of bedrail assessment should have identified further measures to prevent the risk of falls, but staff who carried out the initial assessment and reviews were not adequately trained. It also found that measures identified to protect … Read More »


Survey highlights providers’ bleak regard of Councils

Posted on September 9th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Survey highlights providers’ bleak regard of Councils

A survey of care providers carried out by the Care Association Alliance (CAA), which represents more than 80 local care associations across England, has found that 95% of providers believe that fee increases proposed by Councils in 2016 will not meet the additional costs of the National Living Wage.

The CAA received 224 responses from more than 50 local authority areas, including care home operators, homecare agencies and learning disability providers.

76% of those who had responded to consultations from their local authority believed their local authority had not made any noticeable change to their fee proposals based on provider feedback. 77% of providers surveyed said pre-admission information sent to them by Councils, which was used to set initial fees, was not accurate.

“It would be impossible to remain in business without self-funder cross-subsidy,” said one provider.

“Local authority fees are totally inadequate. Instead … Read More »


‘Red Bags’ improve transfer communication

Posted on September 8th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on ‘Red Bags’ improve transfer communication

By PAUL WILLIAMS

A new scheme designed to improve communication and working practices between the NHS and care homes has been implemented in the London borough of Sutton.

A care home manager’s forum identified room for improvement in the care home to hospital transfer pathway. One of the stories that came to light concerned hospital staff who had spent a considerable amount of time trying to help a care home resident get out of bed and walk because they hadn’t been told he was a wheelchair user.

Now, when a care home resident needs to go into hospital, a red bag containing their personal details, information on health conditions, medication and a change of clothes is packed for them. The bag also has room for other belongings such as toiletries, glasses, hearing aids and dentures. Mary Hopper, a senior NHS manager in Sutton, … Read More »


LJJ wins £3.5m contract with Signature

Posted on September 7th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on LJJ wins £3.5m contract with Signature

Mechanical and electrical contractor LJJ has been awarded a £3.5m building services contract as part of the £16m development of a 96-bed luxury care and assisted

living scheme by Signature Senior Lifestyle in Sunninghill, Berkshire.

Designed by PRP Architects with interiors by Leisure Concepts, the scheme continues LJJ’s relationship with Signature Senior Lifestyle, following three previous projects completed in Brentwood, Marlow and Kingston Upon Thames. Sunninghill is the first project that the building services specialist will deliver for main contractor, Wates Construction. The whole scheme, due for completion in May 2017, is being delivered by LJJ’s Southern office based in High Wycombe.

The luxury new build senior lifestyle and assisted living complex comprises a mix of en-suite one bedroomed apartments and en-suite studio apartments all with kitchenette. Specialist dementia care en-suite bedrooms are provided on the third floor. Facilities will include a cinema, … Read More »


Intermediate care – a massive opportunity despite the challenges

Posted on September 6th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Intermediate care – a massive opportunity despite the challenges

MARK McCARTHY, managing director of Sanctuary Care, talks about the intermediate care model and how Sanctuary Care is managing the practicalities.

Figures released by the NHS show there were close to 6,000 delayed transfers of care in March alone, and, as the number continues to grow, it’s clear a long-term solution to the problem is needed.

Sanctuary Care’s homes provide the ideal platform for an intermediate care offering. Their layout, which includes a collection of large bedrooms, wide corridors and communal areas situated in suites, enables us to use space flexibly, not only with intermediate care, but also residential and nursing care options. Over the years this design has allowed us to work with CCGs and trusts to provide intermediate care without an initial large investment to change the building or facilities.

Generally, our largest outlay is putting vinyl flooring down in the … Read More »


Another good home closes

Posted on September 5th, by geoff in Caring Times, CT blog. 1 Comment

By guest blogger JOHN BURTON

In June I spent an evening and the next day with the residents of a small care home. It’s a really nice place, a family, a little community of five men who have support and friendship from each other and the very small staff group. The best of residential care.

The Care Quality Commission doesn’t agree. Having consistently found it to be compliant and very homely until 2014, CQC reversed their assessment for the next three inspections. Having decided that it was “inadequate” and having removed the manager’s registration, the regulator is now closing the home.

I know that very good homes can deteriorate quickly. Changes of leadership or owner can result in a breakdown of care, and it’s important that the regulator can take action in these situations. If we had a different sort of inspection, where local … Read More »


CQC looks ahead to yesterday’s plan

Posted on September 2nd, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on CQC looks ahead to yesterday’s plan

The regulator’s back-to-the-future take on inspection threatens to bring the curtain down on quality ratings, says BOB FERGUSON

CQC executives have seen the future and the “vision” as revealed to them will work as their strategy for the next five years. Unsurprisingly for people who have had an otherworldly experience, they have been touched by make-believe, convincing themselves that the (re)introduction of a money-saving inspection model at the very time their budget is being cut is just a happy coincidence.

Rarely has credulity been stretched so far. It all got off to such a rocky start. Before the strategy had even been published, the Commission had tabled proposals for higher registration fees, effectively asking care homes to buy a more expensive pig in a poke – one that proved to be a declining level of service.

Providers are entitled to feel short-changed: facing … Read More »


Welcome revisions to Law Commission’s DoLS proposals

Posted on September 1st, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Welcome revisions to Law Commission’s DoLS proposals

RadcliffesLeBrasseur partner JONNY LANDAU says there is much to be welcomed in the Law Commission’s amended proposals for changes to the law regarding mental capacity and deprivation of liberty.

020 7227 6704 jonny.landau@rlb-law.com

 

The Law Commission has published an interim statement about its proposals regarding mental capacity and deprivation of liberty. There is much to be welcomed.

The initially proposed supportive care scheme, which would have applied to people who lack capacity but are not being deprived of their liberty, has been abandoned. In the context of care homes, perhaps not many people would have been caught by the regime because those who lack capacity are also very often not free to leave, and so are deprived of their liberty under the Cheshire West test. However, requiring care homes to assess whether the person falls into one of two possible legal schemes … Read More »


Deprivation of liberty in private supported living care arrangements

Posted on August 31st, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Deprivation of liberty in private supported living care arrangements

By PETER GROSE solicitor, Lester Aldridge www.lesteraldridge.com 01202 786135

Deprivation of liberty of service users who lack mental capacity to consent to care arrangements can be problematic for care providers and local authorities. In care homes and hospitals, managers must apply to the local authority for authorisation under the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. In supported living settings, local authorities must apply to the Court of Protection to authorise a deprivation of liberty in relation to care packages they arrange. However, it has been less clear whether local authorities are responsible for ensuring authorisation in relation to care packages they have not arranged, such as supported living settings or domiciliary care services that are entirely privately funded, e.g. through court awarded damages following a catastrophic accident.

The recent Court of Protection case of Staffordshire County Council v SKR (http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCOP/2016/27.html) has now provided some … Read More »


In denial about fairness?

Posted on August 30th, by geoff in Caring Times, CT blog. 1 Comment

By Caring Times editor Geoff Hodgson

Social care providers are indebted to Health Ltd (SSP), a service provider operating GP practices in England, which won a judicial review in the High Court against the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in July. The case concerned the fairness of the CQC’s complaints procedure and this should ring a bell for social care providers.

I was taken aback by the tenor of the regulator’s response to Mrs Justice Andrews’ ruling that it was “unfair for the CQC to maintain their original finding without making appropriate enquiries”. In a press release – http://www.cqc.org.uk/content/judge-finds-rating-review-process-fair-factual-accuracy-improved – the CQC maintains that “Mrs Justice Andrews does not find that CQC’s rating review process is unfair, nor that it was applied unfairly in this case.”

This is somewhat at odds with the judge’s comment that: “ . . . procedural fairness required the … Read More »





Latest blog posts

Another good home closes

By guest blogger JOHN BURTON

In June I spent an evening and the next day with the residents of a small care home. It’s a really...

In denial about fairness?

By Caring Times editor Geoff Hodgson

Social care providers are indebted to Health Ltd (SSP), a service provider operating GP practices in England, which won...

‘Til death us do part

By guest blogger BOB FERGUSON

A few days ago I stumbled across a radio programme featuring an item about a care home contract that provided for...