Fresh concerns over delays in implementing the cap on care costs


Posted on December 2nd, by admin in Caring Times. No Comments

The Public Accounts Committee has today, Wednesday 2 December, raised new concerns over the delays in implementing the cap on care costs, as set out in the Care Act. The Committee has warned that these delays could mean that older people and their carers will miss out on vital services.  

The lifetime cap on care costs, due to be introduced in April next year, was pushed back to 2020 following requests from local councils over funding allocation. People above state pension age would not be expected to pay more than £72,000 towards their social care; an estimated 35,000 people were expected to have benefitted immediately.

Today’s report has found a lack of transparency in identifying and assessing the new financial implications of the Care Act, and has recommended that a clear timetable for implementation is drawn up.

George McNamara, Head of Policy at Alzheimer’s Society, commented: “The delay to implementing the care cap is leaving older and vulnerable people unable to cope with escalating costs. Under the current system, in 2020 people affected by dementia will be paying a staggering £6.2 billion towards their care, rising to £10.8 billion by 2030.

“There is enormous financial pressure on local councils, but this should not mean that people with dementia and their carers are left footing the bill for essential care and support. The money promised in the Spending Review for social care is insufficient in the face of unprecedented demand. In order to help alleviate the growing financial burden placed on those affected by dementia we need a bold, long-term plan for reform across health and social care.” 

 

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