Tag: Problem-solving


Mnemonic techniques: how to CEASE stress and distress

Posted on September 18th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Fionnuala Edgar describes how using different methods of teaching and learning – experiential learning and simplifying key concepts – had the potential to bring about practice change in a way that had not been achieved previously

Vol 25 No 5 Page 32


Music therapy: positive results, changes that last

Posted on September 18th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Ming Hung Hsu explains how music therapy can help care professionals respond better to the needs of people with dementia, reducing distressing symptoms and improving quality of care

Vol 25 No 5 Page 28


A response framework with untruths as last resort

Posted on July 24th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Sometimes the truth causes distress, but is it ever right to lie to a person with dementia? Edward O’Connor, Ian James and Roberta Caiazza describe a practical framework which allows “therapeutic lies” as a last resort

Vol 25 No 4 Page 22


What is truth? Dilemmas when two realities meet

Posted on March 13th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Should we always tell people with dementia the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth? Graham Stokes and Antonis Kousoulis report on the findings of an inquiry set up to find some answers

Vol 25 No 2 Page 24


Bedrails – a risk-laden remedy

Posted on September 13th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Bedrails – a risk-laden remedy

DAVID EDWARDS,associate solicitor and head of the healthcare and regulatory teams at Harrison Drury Solicitors looks at a recent case involving BUPA Care Homes.

01772 258321 david.edwards@harrison-drury.com

In May this, Bupa Care Homes (CFC Homes) Ltd were brought before Carlisle Magistrates Court by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) in consequence of an incident involving bedrails in which a resident died at one the company’s care homes. Bupa was fined £400,000 with costs of £15,206.

The Court found that the company had failed to ensure that the resident’s bedrail assessment was suitable and sufficient, or that staff were adequately trained in bedrail risk assessments. They Court said reviews of bedrail assessment should have identified further measures to prevent the risk of falls, but staff who carried out the initial assessment and reviews were not adequately trained. It also found that measures identified to protect … Read More »


Exploring the other side of an unsavoury coin

Posted on March 21st, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Lynne Phair’s article on inappropriate sexual expression (JDC Jan/Feb 2016) prompted letters of support from Sarah Mould and Jenny La Fontaine, below. Then Hazel Heath explores the issues further, asking: in our intention to care do we overlook things that might be unpalatable?

Vol 24 No 2 Page 12


Reading dementia: ‘Try your best to think from both sides’

Posted on March 14th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

How do we ‘read’ dementia and how much insight might people have into their own condition? Sarah Hesketh discusses an investigative project based on the stories of three people who lived in the same care home

Vol 24 No 2 Page 24


Creative collaborations: the Care’N’Share app

Posted on March 14th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Alise Kirtley and colleagues describe how they developed their Care’N’Share ‘app’ to help staff come up with creative ideas for person-centred care

Vol 24 No 2 Page 18

 


Posterior cortical atrophy: resources and information

Posted on January 18th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Lesley Wilson and colleagues examine the quality and quantity of information available on posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), in the second of two articles on this unusual form of dementia

Vol 24 No 1 Page 32 – 34


On the other side of the coin

Posted on January 18th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Lynne Phair describes how concerns about her stepfather’s sexually inappropriate behaviour after the onset of vascular dementia led to a deeply personal disclosure

Vol 24 No 1 Page 14 – 15



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