Tag: Clinical Issues


Report details impact of incontinence

Posted on August 22nd, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Report details impact of incontinence

A report on incontinence supported by 10 organisations, including Alzheimer’s Society, Age UK, Marie Curie and Parkinson’s UK recommends tackling the stigma of incontinence and funding research into this important but often ignored issue.

The report ‘My bladder and bowel own my life’ resulted from a workshop to discuss common problems and potential solutions with patients, carers, researchers and health and care staff.

Shelagh Robinson, who is living with dementia and affected by incontinence, said: “People are unwilling to talk about this, but until we do it is going to restrict what we can do.”

The report details the daily impact of incontinence on older people across the UK, especially those living with terminal illnesses or long-term health conditions like dementia, Parkinson’s, cancer, or urinary and gastric issues.

The report’s authors are calling for evaluation of the economic impact of incontinence, more dedicated services … Read More »


Stein urges health secretary to let paramedics work with care homes to relieve burden on A&Es

Posted on May 10th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Stein urges health secretary to let paramedics work with care homes to relieve burden on A&Es

Tony Stein, chief executive of Healthcare Management Solutions, has written to health secretary Jeremy Hunt to

outline how care homes could take some of the strain from busy A&E departments.

Mr Hunt recently called for MPs to come up with ideas for ensuring the NHS and social care are properly funded and fit for purpose.

Mr Stein writes that care homes could look after elderly people requiring care and attention but not medical intervention, freeing up emergency beds for more urgent cases and reducing A&E waiting times.

“When an elderly person has a fall, a dizzy spell or an anxiety attack the immediate solution is to call for an ambulance,” said Mr Stein in his letter.

“Often any alternatives, such as NHS helplines, are useless as the elderly person is too frail, confused or anxious to respond clearly to questions over the telephone. The only … Read More »


EU nurses cite Brexit as top reason for leaving register

Posted on May 1st, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on EU nurses cite Brexit as top reason for leaving register

New figures from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) have shown a significant rise in the number of EU nurses and midwives leaving the register. Between April 2017 and March 2018, 3,962 people left – an increase of 29%.

There continues to be a dramatic drop in those joining the register from the EU. Over the same period 805 EU nurses and midwives joined the register compared with 6,382 the year before – a drop of 87%.

Following a period of sustained decline the number of UK trained nurses and midwives registered to work appears to be stabilising. Those joining the register for the first time is at its highest level for four years while 4,034 fewer people left the register.

The number of nurses and midwives joining the register from outside the EU has also risen for the fourth consecutive year with … Read More »


Funded nursing care increase inadequate, says Care England

Posted on April 9th, by geoff in CT Extra. Comments Off on Funded nursing care increase inadequate, says Care England

Caring Times, April 2018

Provider representatibe body Care England has expressed disappointment that the rate of NHS Funded Nursing Care increase announced for 2018/19 of 2% will not meet the huge pressure being felt in the nursing home sector.

Care England chief executive Professor Martin Green said: “Whilst we recognise and welcome that this is an increase in the rate it does not address the current cost pressures for nursing in our sector. What we need to be clear on is that the cost of the rising dependency of nursing needs of residents exceeds the proposed rate rise. The shortage of nurses – over which we have no control – means that recruiting nurses is a costly challenge along with increasing agency costs associated with rising nurse vacancies.

“The cost of employing nurses is rising with auto pension enrolment and other staff costs … Read More »


New guidelines for recognising and assessing pain in older adults

Posted on March 23rd, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on New guidelines for recognising and assessing pain in older adults

New recommendations to help healthcare professionals recognise and assess levels of pain in older people have been published in the scientific journal Age and Ageing.

The British Geriatrics Society (BGS) says there is growing evidence to demonstrate that chronic pain is more prevalent among the older population and pain that interferes with everyday activities increases with age. Alleviating pain in the older population is therefore a priority.

The guidelines seek to address specific areas in which improvements can be made. Specific areas that were identified as presenting a particular challenge when managing older people’s pain included ‘stoicism’ which can result in the underreporting of pain, the perception that increasing pain is a natural part of ageing and 10 minute consultations in the UK general practice which often limits older adults from engaging in meaningful conversation about their pain. It was also noted … Read More »


Funded nursing care increase is inadequate, says Care England

Posted on March 7th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Funded nursing care increase is inadequate, says Care England

Provider representative body Care England has expressed disappointment that the rate of NHS Funded Nursing Care increase announced for 2018/19 of 2% will not significantly relieve the huge pressure being felt in the nursing home sector.

The organisation’s chief executive, Professor Martin Green, said the increase would not address the current cost pressures for nursing in the sector.

“What we need to be clear on is that the cost of the rising dependency of nursing needs of residents exceeds the proposed rate rise,” said Prof. Green.

“The shortage of nurses – over which we have no control – means that recruiting nurses is a costly challenge along with increasing agency costs associated with rising nurse vacancies.

“The cost of employing nurses is rising with auto pension enrolment and other staff costs – we need to retain our nurses and offer the best employment packages … Read More »


Care home nurses gather to celebrate clinical excellence

Posted on February 16th, by geoff in CT Extra. Comments Off on Care home nurses gather to celebrate clinical excellence

Caring Times, February 2018

Care home nurses from across the South have come together for a team conference focused on learning and the pursuit of clinical excellence.

More than 60 registered general and mental health nurses employed by family-owned Colten Care discussed topics they themselves had put forward for the agenda.

Represented were all 20 of the provider’s homes in Hampshire, Dorset, Wiltshire and Sussex, including its five dedicated dementia care settings.

The conference, at AFC Bournemouth’s Vitality Stadium, was designed to celebrate nursing and consolidate professional development and learning through presentations and clinical workshops.

Leading the day were clinical managers Lindsay Rees and Lisa Barnes-Metcalf. Lindsay said: “This was a chance to restate our commitment to invest in nursing despite the recruitment challenges facing the whole healthcare sector.

“It showed that we really do value the contribution that our nurses make and we understand the … Read More »


Study finding: people die more comfortably in a care home

Posted on January 18th, by geoff in CT Extra. Comments Off on Study finding: people die more comfortably in a care home

 

Caring Times, December 2017

Very old people are more likely to die comfortably if they die in a care home or at home, compared with dying in a hospital, suggests a new study from the University of Cambridge. Yet while the overwhelming majority of very old people reported symptoms at the end of life such as distress, pain and depression, the study found that these were not always treated effectively.

 

The researchers argue that their findings highlight the need to improve training in end-of-life care for all staff, in all settings, and in particular to address the current shortage of palliative care doctors in the NHS.

 

As life expectancy increases, so more and more people are dying at increasingly older ages, often affected by multiple conditions such as dementia, heart disease and cancer, which make their end-of-life care complicated. In the UK, in … Read More »


Delayed discharges lose almost 4m hospital days since 2011

Posted on November 30th, by geoff in Caring Times, CT Extra. Comments Off on Delayed discharges lose almost 4m hospital days since 2011

Caring Times, December 2017

National older people’s charity Age UK says that, since 2011 almost four million hospital bed days have been lost through delayed discharges due to problems securing social care, with delays getting homecare rocketing by 209% in six years.

The charity says it’s getting worse, with the starkest increase occurring between 2015/16 and 2016/17, when there was a 27.2% rise in the number of bed days lost through an inability to have social care arrangements in place, from 695,037 days, to 954,799 days.

And the latest available figures show that in the period between April and July 2017, there have been 13.2% more days lost to social care than during the same period in 2016. Whilst there is no age breakdown available for patients affected by delayed hospital discharge they are typically older people. Age UK charity director Caroline Abrahams … Read More »


Free flu jabs for care home workers

Posted on November 28th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Free flu jabs for care home workers

Commenting on NHS England’s decision to offer free flu vaccinations to care home workers, Professor Martin Green, chief executive of independent provider representative body Care England, said his organisation had long campaigned on the issue.

“In the past the independent sector has been overlooked and providers have had to foot the bill themselves which, in a climate of severe financial pressures, has been difficult,” said Prof. Green.

“Being ready for winter and offering extra capacity to the already stretched NHS is yet another area where the independent sector can help.”

In a circular from NHS England, Department of Health and Public Health England the new programme for vaccinating people at risk was unveiled. It highlighted the virulent strain of flu in Australia and New Zealand and echoed messages of needing to prepare front line health and social care staff.

The International Longevity Centre – … Read More »



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