Tag: Culture/Models of care


Guide helps care homes give better support to armed services veterans

Posted on June 14th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Guide helps care homes give better support to armed services veterans

A guide was launched in early June to help care homes provide better support for the hundreds of thousands of service men and women in living in care settings in the UK.

Produced by Demos think tank, in partnership with the Forces in Mind Trust and the Care Cluster of Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities), the guide will be sent to all UK care homes and care home provider headquarters.

Demos director Polly Mackenzie said the guide had been created in response to the 2015 Demos report ‘Under-Served’.

“The report found that veterans can face a range of challenges while living in residential care, yet managers and staff lack the information and resources they needed to know how best to support them,” said Ms Mackenzie.

“The aim of the guide is to fill that gap.‘Supporting Military Veterans in Residential Care – a practical … Read More »


Pyjama scrubs reduce sleep deprivation at Runcorn care home

Posted on June 13th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Pyjama scrubs reduce sleep deprivation at Runcorn care home

Pyjama-style uniforms for care home night staff have significantly reduced sleep deprivation, pacing and

disorientation among residents living with dementia.

The switch to scrubs covered in cartoon cats and love hearts was trialled at Simonsfield care home in Runcorn, Cheshire.

Staff are required to conduct regular checks on residents and both the day and night teams previously wore the same blue scrubs. Many of the home’s residents with dementia had trouble differentiating between the two and this could confuse them about sleeping times. Disorientation and pacing was a regular occurrence during night time hours, leading to sleep deprivation and associated lack of energy, irritability and mood swings.

Infection control guidelines mean staff cannot wear pyjamas, so home manager Debbie Smith came up with the idea of cartoon patterned scrubs for night staff.

“We thought we’d try out scrubs that mimic pyjamas for the night carers … Read More »


Stein urges health secretary to let paramedics work with care homes to relieve burden on A&Es

Posted on May 10th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Stein urges health secretary to let paramedics work with care homes to relieve burden on A&Es

Tony Stein, chief executive of Healthcare Management Solutions, has written to health secretary Jeremy Hunt to

outline how care homes could take some of the strain from busy A&E departments.

Mr Hunt recently called for MPs to come up with ideas for ensuring the NHS and social care are properly funded and fit for purpose.

Mr Stein writes that care homes could look after elderly people requiring care and attention but not medical intervention, freeing up emergency beds for more urgent cases and reducing A&E waiting times.

“When an elderly person has a fall, a dizzy spell or an anxiety attack the immediate solution is to call for an ambulance,” said Mr Stein in his letter.

“Often any alternatives, such as NHS helplines, are useless as the elderly person is too frail, confused or anxious to respond clearly to questions over the telephone. The only … Read More »


‘Technology is no substitute for the human touch’ says Scottish Care leader

Posted on April 20th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on ‘Technology is no substitute for the human touch’ says Scottish Care leader

Members of the Scottish Parliament have been cautioned against an over-reliance on technology as a means of reducing the cost of delivering social care.

Addressing an economy, jobs and fair work committee of the Scottish Parliament, Scottish Care chief executive Donald Macaskill said there were many instances in which technological solutions in care had been developed in Scotland and then been exported elsewhere.

“While technology has potential it must not be used to monitor staff, and advancements would involve implementation costs, training and equipping the sector’s workforce,” said Mr Macaskill.

“We need an appropriate balance. Technology cannot be used as a cheap mechanism to remove human presence. “We are all human beings, we are about human touch. Technology can certainly enable presence but it cannot replace it.”

Mr Macaskill called on organisations like Skills Development Scotland, Scottish Enterprise and Business Gateway to focus on … Read More »


Integration is a ‘smokescreen’, says report

Posted on March 29th, by geoff in Caring Times. No Comments

A report by the Centre for Welfare Reform challenges the concept of health and social care integration and calls for a new, independent inspection body for social care.

Published in late March, ‘Reforming Social Care – time for radical change’ expresses doubt that any of the main political parties understand the seriousness of the situation facing social care or have the strategies to respond effectively to any of the challenges it presents.

The report’s author, Dr Robin Jackson, visiting research fellow at the University of Hertfordshire, debunks the idea of health and social care integration, citing Dame Denise Platt, the outgoing chair of the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) who, 10 years ago , said the values of social care might be similar to health but the underpinning policy assumptions were different.

“The argument that a merger of health and social care … Read More »


NICE issues guideline for adult social care

Posted on March 1st, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on NICE issues guideline for adult social care

NICE has launched a new guideline on People’s experience in adult social care services: improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services.

The guideline covers good practice in the care and support of all adults who use services and aims to improve their experience of services.

People who use services were involved in the development of the guideline and the recommendations are based on what they consider to be important in their care and support.

The guideline can be viewed on the NICE website: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng86


Call for insurance costs to be cut for care homes with cameras

Posted on February 16th, by geoff in CT Extra. Comments Off on Call for insurance costs to be cut for care homes with cameras

Caring Times, February 2018

The cost of insurance for care home operators could be slashed by installing CCTV, according to Philip Scott of pioneering safety organisation Care Protect.

Mr Scott is calling on insurers to take the reduced risk to patients in homes with CCTV systems installed, and subsequent reduction in financial and reputational risk to homes, into account when calculating premiums.

The operator of a care home with 70 beds can currently expect to pay up to £10,000 a year for insurance, while the premium for nursing homes and those offering specialised services can be significantly more.

Care Protect’s monitoring system employs the latest sound and motion sensitive technology which when activated by a ‘resident event’, triggers recording which within seconds alerts the 24/7 professional monitor. This reduces risk because assistance can be provided to a resident within seconds of the event having … Read More »


2nd February deadline to join Care innovation Challenge

Posted on January 11th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on 2nd February deadline to join Care innovation Challenge

Students have until Friday, February 2nd to apply to enter the Care Innovation Challenge, which takes place at the Oomph! Wellness HQ in Wimbledon on February 17th and 18th where teams from across the country will spend two days of intensive ideas generation, development and prototyping.

Teams must consist of two or three people, made up of students (undergrad, postgrad) or graduates who are one year post-graduation. The competition is open to students from all faculties and disciplines and teams do not need to be focused on technology. The competition is also open to any other individuals (non-students) with an idea for the care sector to apply as a team.

The Care Innovation Challenge has been created in response to the growing challenges and mounting pressure on the care sector, the aim being to work with creative and entrepreneurial individuals and teams to … Read More »


Oomph!: from care homes into the community

Posted on December 1st, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Oomph!: from care homes into the community

With £915k National Lottery Funding from Sport England, Oomph! aims to get 27,000 adults doing regular exercise within two years.

 

Oomph! Wellness, a social enterprise dedicated to enhancing the mental, physical and emotional wellbeing of older adults, has been announced as the largest delivery partner of Sport England’s £10m Active Ageing Fund.

The organisatiom pans to train around 1600 workers and volunteers in retirement villages and community venues to run adapted sports activities for older people.

Oomph! is prioritising online applications from venues in the North West of England and London and the South East before moving on to other regions.The organisation is best known for transforming exercise and activity provision in care homes, working with many of the biggest providers to put quality of life front and centre. It was established in 2011 by young entrepreneur Ben Allen.

Sport England has put tackling inactivity … Read More »


Study: people die more comfortably in a care home

Posted on November 23rd, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Study: people die more comfortably in a care home

Very old people are more likely to die comfortably if they die in a care home or at home, compared with dying in a hospital, suggests a new study from the University of Cambridge.

Yet while the overwhelming majority of very old people reported symptoms at the end of life such as distress, pain and depression, the study found that these were not always treated effectively.

Older people with dementia commonly report multiple symptoms as they approach the end-of-life, and if these symptoms are not adequately controlled, they may increase distress and worsen an individual’s quality of life.

The researchers argue that their findings highlight the need to improve training in end-of-life care for all staff, in all settings, and in particular to address the current shortage of palliative care doctors in the NHS.

Compared with people who died in hospital, the odds of … Read More »



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