Tag: Research


Smart technology to monitor health and well-being

Posted on March 13th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Smart gadgets placed strategically in people’s homes can yield round-the-clock information on their health in real time. Helen Rostill and Ramin Nilforooshan explain their new “internet of things” project

Vol 25 No 2 Page 18


Committee looks to Manchester for solutions

Posted on January 13th, by geoff in CT Extra. Comments Off on Committee looks to Manchester for solutions

Caring Times, January 2017

In early December, the House of Lords Committee on the Long-Term Sustainability of the NHS met to take evidence from the leaders of the new Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership, the devolved body which now controls a £6bn annual budget to deliver health and social care in Greater Manchester.

The Committee wanted to explore whether the pioneering devolved model in Manchester could provide lessons that different regions or UK as a whole could learn from when delivering sustainable health services to an ageing population with increasingly complex healthcare needs.

Questions covered the impact of devolution on health and social care in Greater Manchester including how funding is now distributed differently around the system, the effect on workforce planning and what benefits the devolution has produced in integrating health and social care services.

The Committee also sought information about … Read More »


Common sense to evidence-based practice

Posted on September 19th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Researchers Alys Griffiths, Sahdia Parveen and Cara Gates draw on their own experience to explain why care work can lay the foundations for an academic career

Vol 24 No 5 Page 32


A self-management group for people with dementia

Posted on September 19th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

How can people with early stage dementia be helped to be more confident in managing their everyday lives? Catherine Quinn, Gill Toms, Sue Davies, Maureen Davies and Linda Clare discuss findings from a new self-management programme

Vol 24 No 5 Page 29


Living in care: an exercise to promote empathy

Posted on September 19th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

How can care staff be encouraged to take a broader view of behaviours that challenge? Ian James and colleagues explain how an exercise in empathy helped staff gain a better understanding of these behaviours

Vol 24 No 5 Page 26


Getting to know the voluntary sector

Posted on September 19th, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

At a time of increasing pressure on hospital beds, do hospital nurses make the most of local dementia voluntary groups? ask Tara Smith and Jill Manthorpe

Vol 24 No 5 Page 20


More than nutrition: food-related care

Posted on May 23rd, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Food is about much more than nutrition, say Iliatha Papachristou and Gary Hickey. They argue that the various activities centred on it can help family carers to cope and enable people to live independently for longer

Vol 24 No 3 Pages 30-31


How woodlands and forests enhance mental well-being

Posted on May 23rd, by jacob in Journal of Dementia Care. No Comments

Woods and forests can enhance the psychological well-being of people with early stage dementia, yet relatively little is known about the meaning and use of these settings. Mandy Cook reports on her research demonstrating the value of the great outdoors.

Vol 24 No 3 Pages 20-23


‘Future of adult social care looks bleak,’ says ILC economist

Posted on January 3rd, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on ‘Future of adult social care looks bleak,’ says ILC economist

Detailed analysis of the social care funding measures outlined in the Spending Review reveals a bleak future for older people needing care, according to the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK).

About 1.86m people over the age of 50 in England (1 in 10) have unmet care needs – an increase of 120,000 people (or 7%) since 2008/9, says the ILC. Data from 326 local authorities had shown that the councils with the highest concentration of older people and unpaid carers would be the ones that will bring in the least amount of money from the 2% council tax precept.

ILC-UK points out that even if the Spending Review announcements bring £3.5bn into adult social care, a scenario they describe as “highly unlikely”, this will still only mean that spending on care returns to 2015 levels by the end of the Parliament. … Read More »


Living Wage Survey – we need your input

Posted on October 27th, by geoff in Caring Times. Comments Off on Living Wage Survey – we need your input

Alongside the need for sustained lobbying by providers and trade bodies, sector analyst LaingBuisson has partnered with Caring Times to conduct a survey of care providers to gauge the impact of the National Living Wage.

To do this we need as high a volume of data as possible. To ensure that your home’s data is part of this survey we ask you to visit www.laingbuisson.co.uk and follow the links to answer a short series of questions covering staff, salaries and resident numbers.

The results of this survey will be analysed by LaingBuisson’s team of long term care consultants who will produce a definitive review of existing carer pay rates from which scenarios can be drawn which reflect the true impact of the NLW in a way which the government will be forced to address. Aggregate only data only will be reported. No … Read More »



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